Toyota is Building the World’s First Megawatt-Scale 100% Renewable Power and Hydrogen Generation Station

It will be the first Toyota facility in North America to use 100% Renewable Power

Toyota is Building the World's First Megawatt-Scale 100% Renewable Power and Hydrogen Generation Station
Image: Toyota

According to reports, Toyota Motor North America, Inc. (TMNA) is building the world’s first megawatt-scale carbonate fuel cell power generation plant with a hydrogen generation station. The Tri-Gen company will utilize bio-squander sourced from California agrarian waste to produce water, power, and hydrogen.

From this renewable source, the company will generate approximately 2.35 megawatts of electricity and 1.2 tons of hydrogen per day. This is sufficient to power almost 2,350 average-sized homes and meets the daily driving needs of nearly 1,500 vehicles.

Doug Murtha, Group Vice President- Strategic Planning said, “For more than twenty years, Toyota has been leading the development of fuel cell technology because we understand the tremendous potential to reduce emissions and improve society.”

“Tri-Gen is a major step forward for sustainable mobility and a key accomplishment of our 2050 Environmental Challenge to achieve net zero CO2 emissions from our operations.”

Tri-Gen is a key advance forward in Toyota’s work to build up a hydrogen society. Notwithstanding filling in as a key verification of-idea for 100% inexhaustible, neighborhood hydrogen age at scale, the office will supply all Toyota power module vehicles traveling through the Port, including new conveyances of the Mirai and Toyota’s Heavy Duty hydrogen energy component class 8 truck, known as Project Portal.

To help these refueling operations, Toyota has additionally fabricated one of the biggest hydrogen powering stations on the planet on location with the assistance of Air Liquide.

Engineers believe that the facility will surpass California’s strict air quality norms and advances the general objectives of the California Air Resources Board, the California Energy Commission, and the Air Quality Management Districts of the South Coast and the Bay Area, who have been pioneers in the work to lessen outflows and enhance air quality.