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An artistic representation of the pH-gradient enabled microscale bipolar interface (PMBI) created by Vijay Ramani and his lab.

High-powered fuel cell boosts electric-powered submersibles, drones

The transportation sector is a major segment of the US economy: about 1 in 5 dollars in the US is spent annually on transportation...
Why women tend to stay mentally sharp longer than men?

Why women tend to stay mentally sharp longer than men?

Sex differences influence brain morphology and physiology during both development and aging. The brain’s metabolism slows as people grow older, and this, too, may differ...
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have discovered clues to a particularly deadly form of rejection that can follow lung transplantation. Called antibody-mediated rejection, the condition remains impervious to available treatments and difficult to diagnose. The researchers have identified, in mice, a process that may prevent the condition and lead to possible therapies to treat it.

New clues discovered to lung transplant rejection

Lung transplantation often remains the only viable option for improving the survival of patients with end-stage lung disease. This condition can be brought on by...
This CT scan of a rat shows a small device implanted around the bladder. The device — developed by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine, the University of Illinois and Northwestern University — uses light signals from tiny LEDs to activate nerve cells in the bladder and control problems such as incontinence and overactive bladder. (Image: Gereau lab)

Tiny, implantable device uses light to treat bladder problems

Scientists and engineers at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have developed a tiny, implantable device that can detect overactivity in...
In the largest genetic study of Alzheimer's disease, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the University of California, San Francisco, have found that genes that increase risk of cardiovascular disease also heighten the risk for Alzheimer’s.

Cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s genetically linked

An international team of scientists has identified DNA from almost 1.5 million people and identified points of DNA that appear to be involved both in cardiovascular disease...
The olfactory epithelium — a mouse's is pictured in green — is a sheet of tissue that develops in the nasal cavity. Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have uncovered new details on how the olfactory epithelium develops and why it is that some animals have such great senses of smell, compared with others that lack such ability.

Study provides new insights on how sense of smell develops

Dogs have a good sense of smell. Through just a smell, they can identify any object, person etc. Among dogs and other animals that rely...
A patient receives radiation therapy. A new study shows higher doses of radiation do not improve survival for many patients with prostate cancer. (Photo: Getty Images)

Higher doses of radiation don’t improve survival in prostate cancer, study

Gathering data by comparing the standard radiation treatment, a new study by the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that higher...
A team of scientists at Washington University in St. Louis has developed a new way to track folding patterns in the brains of premature babies. It's hoped this new process could someday be used for diagnosing a host of diseases, including autism and schizophrenia. (Image: Bayly Lab)

3-D mapping babies’ brains

Babies brain grows rapidly in utero. Their cerebral cortex drastically expands surface area. Many studies have suggested that this rapid and essential growth is...
Andrew Knight, associate professor of organizational behavior at Olin Business School, led a study that found that employees in a business with direct customer involvement tend to be happier.

Customer-facing companies have happier workers

According to a new study by Andrew Knight, associate professor of organizational behavior at Washington University in St. Louis, people working in customer-facing companies,...

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