Scientist just found a previously unknown part of the human brain

The region is found near the brain-spinal cord junction.

The Endorestiform Nucleus is located near the junction of the brain and the spinal cord(Credit: NeuRA)
The Endorestiform Nucleus is located near the junction of the brain and the spinal cord(Credit: NeuRA)

World-renowned cartographer of the brain, Scientia Professor George Paxinos AO, from Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) has recently discovered a previously unknown hidden part of the brain. He found the region close to brain-spinal cord junction.

Scientists have named this region as Endorestiform Nucleus. This discovery is expected to help scientists explore cures for diseases including Parkinson’s disease and motor neuron disease.

The Endorestiform Nucleus was hidden within the inferior cerebellar peduncle(Credit: NeuRA)
The Endorestiform Nucleus was hidden within the inferior cerebellar peduncle(Credit: NeuRA)

Professor Paxinos identified the region almost 30 years before, but due to lack of better techniques, he was unable to make it clear. Now, by using better staining and imaging techniques, he found that the Endorestiform Nucleus is located within the inferior cerebellar peduncle. The Inferior cerebellar peduncle is an area that integrates sensory and motor information to refine our posture, balance, and fine motor movements.

Professor Paxinos said, “The region is intriguing because it seems to be absent in the rhesus monkey and other animals that we have studied. This region could be what makes humans unique besides our larger brain size.”

The Endorestiform Nucleus is located within the inferior cerebellar peduncle(Credit: NeuRA)
The Endorestiform Nucleus is located within the inferior cerebellar peduncle(Credit: NeuRA)

“I can only guess as to its function, but given the part of the brain where it has been found, it might be involved in fine motor control.”

Professor Peter Schofield, CEO at NeuRA said, “Professor Paxinos’ atlases showing detailed morphology and connections of the human brain and spinal cord, provide a critical framework for researchers to test hypotheses from synaptic function to treatments for diseases of the brain.”

The Endorestiform Nucleus could play a part in fine motor control(Credit: NeuRA)
The Endorestiform Nucleus could play a part in fine motor control(Credit: NeuRA)

Natalie Farra, Senior Editor at Elsevier said, “It is truly an honor for Elsevier to be continuing Professor Paxinos’ legacy of publishing with us. His books are world-renowned for their expertise and utility for brain mapping, and for their contributions to our understanding of the structure, function, and development of the brain.”

The discovery of the Endorestiform Nucleus is detailed in Professor Paxinos latest book titled Human Brainstem: Cytoarchitecture, Chemoarchitecture, Myeloarchitecture available for order this November 2018.

YOU'LL ALSO LIKE