Research offers front-row seat to a galactic pile-up

An incredible opportunity to study how galaxy clusters and their massive galaxies came together.

This figure highlights galaxies discovered by ALMA that are evolving into a galaxy cluster. The outer field is from data taken by the Hershel Space Observatory. The middle image, from a survey by the National Science Foundation’s South Pole Telescope, uncovered the distant galactic source that revealed 14 galaxies.
This figure highlights galaxies discovered by ALMA that are evolving into a galaxy cluster. The outer field is from data taken by the Hershel Space Observatory. The middle image, from a survey by the National Science Foundation’s South Pole Telescope, uncovered the distant galactic source that revealed 14 galaxies.

Massive galaxy clusters have been found that date to times as early as three billion years after the Big Bang, containing stars that formed at even earlier epochs. are the largest objects in the known universe, with as many as 1,000 galaxies.

The galactic crash will turn into a monstrous cosmic system group. Researchers know this in light of the fact that the impact is found 12.4 billion light-years from Earth. Its light started venturing out to where we could see it when the universe was just 1.4 billion years of age or about a tenth of the universe’s present age.

Now a new study led by Tim Miller, a doctoral candidate in astronomy, centers around a protocluster known as SPT2349-56. Utilizing the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), a global research group could think about SPT2349-56 in detail.

Miller said, “How this assembly of galaxies got so big so fast is a bit of a mystery. It wasn’t built up gradually over billions of years, as astronomers might expect. This discovery provides an incredible opportunity to study how galaxy clusters and their massive galaxies came together in these extreme environments.”

The study is published in the journal Nature.