New production method for viruses that attack bacteria

News-Special "Multi-resistant bacteria".

The „Phactory“-team at the award ceremony in Boston. They received the second prize for their new production method of bacteriophages at the international iGEM-competition. (Image: G. Westmeyer / TUM)
The „Phactory“-team at the award ceremony in Boston. They received the second prize for their new production method of bacteriophages at the international iGEM-competition. (Image: G. Westmeyer / TUM)

Bacteriophages, or phages for short, are infections that can assault and specifically eliminate bacteria. They are viewed as a viable option in contrast to antibiotics. Be that as it may, an absence of appropriate strategies for securely and neatly creating phages has been a deterrent to their helpful application.

A team of students from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Ludwig-Maximilians University (LMU) has developed a new method in the project “Phactory” to produce bacteriophages, the natural enemies of bacteria, which can be used as alternative treatments for bacterial infections. The team took second place among over 350 teams in the renowned global iGEM competition.

Scientists have developed the phages in a fast, safe and uncomplicated method for producing phages. The method is based on a cell-free system that produces safe and clean bacteriophages.

As a major aspect of their task, the understudies prevailing with regards to delivering bacteriophages against E. coli (EHEC) diseases, which have turned out to be outstanding in Germany because of a plague in 2011.

The group likewise created programming that can decide whether the phages delivered along these lines are tainted by hereditary material from other microbes or infections. Phages free of pollutions are fundamental for restorative use in people.

All together for the phages to be regulated orally, the group additionally embodied them in a shell made up of different natural substances. This guarantees the phages are not pulverized by gastric squeezes and achieve their site of action in the intestine intact.