NASA’s ARIA maps California wildfires from space

California continues to be plagued by wildfires.

The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created these Damage Proxy Maps (DPMs) depicting areas in California likely damaged by the Woolsey and Camp Fires.
The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created these Damage Proxy Maps (DPMs) depicting areas in California likely damaged by the Woolsey and Camp Fires.

The deadly wildfires ripping through California have forced hundreds of thousands of residents to evacuate, including some celebrities whose homes have been lost to the blazes. Now, NASA satellites are observing these fires — and the damage they’re leaving behind — from space.

The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) group at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, delivered new harm maps utilizing engineered opening radar images from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 satellites.

The primary guide indicates regions likely harmed by the Woolsey Fire as of Sunday, Nov. 11. It covers a territory of around 50 miles by 25 miles (80 km by 40 km) — surrounded by the red polygon. The shading variety from yellow to red demonstrates expanding ground surface change, or harm.

The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created these Damage Proxy Maps (DPMs) depicting areas in California likely damaged by the Woolsey and Camp Fires.
The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created these Damage Proxy Maps (DPMs) depicting areas in California likely damaged by the Woolsey and Camp Fires.

The second map (above) indicates damage from the Camp Fire in Northern California as of Saturday, Nov. 10. It delineates a region of around 55 miles by 48 miles (88 km by 77 km) and incorporates the city of Paradise, a standout amongst the most crushed zones. Like the past guide, red zones demonstrate the most serious surface change or harm. The ARIA group contrasted the information for the two pictures with the Google Crisis map for fundamental approval.

In spite of the fact that the maps might be less solid over a vegetated landscape, similar to farmland, they can encourage authorities and specialists on call distinguish intensely harmed territories and allow assets as required.

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