Individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are often hospitalized after starting antibiotic

Investigating the frequency and risk of hospitalization associated with oral antibiotic initiation among community dwellers with and without the AD.

Image: ALZHEIMER’S SOCIETY OF TORONTO
Image: ALZHEIMER’S SOCIETY OF TORONTO

Persons with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are frequently hospitalized from infection-related causes. There are no previous studies investigating hospitalization associated with antibiotic initiation in persons with AD.

In a new study, scientists investigated the frequency and risk of hospitalization associated with oral antibiotic initiation among community dwellers with and without AD.

A new study by the University of Eastern Finland shows that People with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are more likely to get hospitalized after introducing antibiotic than individuals without the AD. The risk of hospitalization was 40 percent higher for persons with Alzheimer’s disease.

For the study, scientists used data from a Finnish register-based cohort, which incorporates all people determined to have Alzheimer’s disease in Finland amid 2005– 2011. The specialists examined 34,785 people who utilized antibiotics in an outpatient setting after their Alzheimer’s infection diagnosis, and their comparison people coordinated by age, sex and area of residence.

Out of individual antibiotics, persons with Alzheimer’s disease were more often hospitalized than people without AD after the initiation of cephalexin, pivmecillinam, amoxicillin, and doxycycline. Hospitalization was associated with pre-existing illnesses, such as epilepsy or cancer, and certain medications, such as antipsychotic and benzodiazepine use.

Although scientists noted that further research is needed to determine whether infection-related hospitalization could be reduced. The results of this study are published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.