IBM Announces World’s First Commercial ‘Universal’ Quantum Computing Service

Quantum Computing Service
IBM Quantum Computing Scientists Hanhee Paik (left) and Sarah Sheldon (right) examine the hardware inside an open dilution fridge at the IBM Q Lab at IBM's T. J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown, NY. On Monday, March 6, IBM announced that it will build commercially available universal quantum computing systems. IBM Q quantum systems and services will be delivered via the IBM Cloud platform and will be designed to tackle problems that are too complex and exponential in nature for classical computing systems to handle. One of the first and most promising applications for quantum computing will be in the area of chemistry and could lead to the discovery of new medicines and materials. IBM aims at constructing commercial IBM Q systems with ~50 qubits in the next few years to demonstrate capabilities beyond today’s classical systems, and plans to collaborate with key industry partners to develop applications that exploit the quantum speedup of the systems. (Connie Zhou for IBM) source

Quantum computing is the technology that many scientists expect to offer a, well, quantum leap into the future. Although, it is a conceptually counterintuitive area of science. To make it available worldwide, IBM Q building the first universal quantum computing service for business and science.

The company has announced that they are developing a system that based on IBM’s Quantum Experience. It is a software development platform for programmers and developers interested in designing and building real quantum-based applications.

Unlike normal computers, Quantum computers work on quantum bits. And due to this, they hold the ability to solve problems and run applications that are impossible.

Arvind Krishna, director for IBM Research said, “IBM has invested over decades to growing the field of quantum computing. We are committed to expanding access to quantum systems and their powerful capabilities for the science and business communities.”

“Following Watson and blockchain, we believe that quantum computing will offer the next powerful set of services delivered via the IBM Cloud platform, and promises to be the next major technology that has the potential to drive a new era of innovation across industries.”

IBM Q Quantum Computing service will be delivered via the IBM Cloud platform. One of the first and most promising applications for quantum computing will be in the area of chemistry and could lead to the discovery of new medicines and materials.

IBM develops this system with the aim to expand the application domain of quantum computing. It will consist of a key metric that powers the quantum computer that is expressed by quantum volume. So, to increase quantum volume, the company developing the system with 50-qubits to challenge the conventional systems.

In addition to the service, IBM releasing new API and upgraded simulator for IBM quantum experience. This API will allow developers to create interfaces between the cloud-based quantum computer and classical computers.

Tom Rosamilia, senior vice president of IBM Systems said, “Classical computers are extraordinarily powerful and will continue to advance and underpin everything we do in business and society. But there are many problems that will never be penetrated by a classical computer. To create knowledge from greater depths of complexity, we need a quantum computer.”

“We envision IBM Q systems working in concert with our portfolio of classical high-performance systems to address problems that are now unsolvable, but hold tremendous untapped value.”