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Elon Musk shares picture of new SpaceX rocket, which will take humans to mars

Elon Musk shared pictures on Twitter showing the construction of a prototype of SpaceX's massive Mars-bound spaceship at a launch site in Texas.

Elon Musk, the founder, CEO and lead designer of SpaceX wants to have humans on Mars in the next few decades. His desire is to colonize Mars so the human species can be conserved in the event of a third world war.

In spite of its chaotic schedule of launching satellites this year, SpaceX is taking major steps toward CEO Elon Musk’s ultimate goal to send humans to Mars.

In accordance with that, CEO Elon Musk took to social media early Christmas evening to share a photograph of a new rocket that will take humans to Mars.

Posting on Twitter, he showed the construction of a prototype spaceship at SpaceX’s facility in Boca Chica, Texas. This prototype spaceship is also known as BFR (abbreviation for Big Falcon Rocket)- a part of SpaceX’s fully reusable Big Falcon Rocket system, which also includes a 219-foot-tall rocket booster that Musk calls Super Heavy.

The model being manufactured is basically a shorter variant of the Starship rocket, however, its diameter is full-size: 30 feet. The model of Super Heavy will be full-scale and will liftoff thrust of 5,400 tons, far more than the Falcon Heavy’s 2,500 tons.

As per the reports, SpaceX will begin testing the new rocket in 2019 with “hopper” flights. These will just test the system’s rockets, launching it up into the air and then straight back down.

He said, “There is a 60% and rapidly rising” chance that the completed spaceship could launch into orbit by 2020.”

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